Events

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Aug 19, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 20, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 21, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 22, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 23, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 24, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 25, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 26, 2018

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 27, 2018

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 28, 2018

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 29, 2018

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 30, 2018

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).  

Aug 31, 2018

CELEBRATE TEXAS: ART & FASHION

Exhibit at the Noel Art Museum, 4909 E. University Blvd, Odessa TX 79762

Texans have an inherent sense of state pride; it is something that is bred into us. The landscape has so much to offer, the piney woods of east Texas, the flats of the panhandle, the West Texas skies, the canyons in Big Bend, the lush Hill Country and let’s not forget the coast. 

This exhibition is a chance to highlight some of the people that have made this state so great. Some had families that had been here for generations while others got here as soon as they could. The scope of the work in this exhibition brings the stories of these individuals to life. Their passion is seen through every brush stroke and every stitch.  
 
Celebrate Texas will focus on artists from the 1850s to the 1940s and fashion designers from 1910 to the present day. Exhibition highlights include: hand crafted silver from Samuel Bell (1798-1882), pottery made by H. Wilson & Co. (1869-1903) the first black enterprise in Texas after the Civil War, plus dresses worn by First Lady Laura Bush (designer Michael Faircloth) and Governor Ann Richards (designer Les Wilk).