Events

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Jul 01, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 02, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 03, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 04, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 05, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 06, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 07, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 08, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 09, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 10, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 11, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 12, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 13, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 14, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 15, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 16, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 17, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 18, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 19, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 20, 2018

Never a Dull Moment: The Art of Grace Spaulding John

Through July 20, 2018
Grace Spaulding John was born in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1890. Her father was a newspaper editor and publisher, and the family lived in Vermont before settling in Beaumont, Texas during the early 1900s. After completing high school, John enrolled at the St. Louis School of Fine Art in 1909. Three years later, she began studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. John continued her studies, first at the Parsons School of Design in New York and later at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. In 1923, she was among an elite group of eight young American artists who received fellowships to study at Laurelton Hall — the Long Island estate of Louis Comfort Tiffany.

Examples of Grace Spaulding John’s work can be found at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts Los Angeles, and the Smithsonian, among other institutions. Murals created by John can be found in Houston City Hall, Lanier Middle School in Houston, and Lakewood Yacht Club in Clear Lake. She continued to work until her death in Houston in 1972.

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 21, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 22, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 23, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 24, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 25, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 26, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 27, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 28, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 29, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 30, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Jul 31, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.”