Events

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Aug 01, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 02, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 03, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 04, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 05, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 06, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 07, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 08, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 09, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 10, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 11, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 12, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 13, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 14, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 15, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 16, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 17, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 18, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 19, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 20, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 21, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 22, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 23, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 24, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.” 

Aug 25, 2018

TWO WORLDS: THE REALITY OF ABSTRACTION

At the Old Jail Art Center, 201 South 2nd Street, Albany, TX, 76430
Two Worlds
 considers the a loaned work by American artist Norman Lewis (1909-1979) titled Untitled (Subway Station), 1945, and selections from the Old Jail Art Center’s permanent collection as the artists explore the balance between depicting reality and investigating non-objective creations through abstraction. Within the permanent collection selections to be included are works by mid-twentieth century Texas artists known as the Fort Worth Circle. 

At the same time Lewis was transitioning from Social Realism to abstraction in the 1940s Harlem New York, the Fort Worth Circle artists were also investigating the possibilities of abstraction. During this time, Lewis was abandoning realism as a means of expression due to his personal recognition of its ineffectiveness for social change. Instead he elected to create works that were “inherently aesthetic” in nature. Similarly, the Fort Worth Circle artists were embracing European modernism, rejecting (eschewing) the prevalent and popular Texas Regionalism and “bluebonnet school.”